The Last Kingdom of Al Andalus

by Franc

Preface

The Sultan of the Emirate of Granada must surrender his palace, city and lands to the Catholic Monarchs.


-Written by Franc Jabier Rodriguez

(Contents)

Dramatis

Personae ix

ACT I

ACT II

ACT III

ACT IV

ACT V

(Dramatis Personae)

MUHAMMAD-the last Nasrid sultan of the Emirate of Granada.

FERDINAND-King of Aragón.

ISABELLA-Queen of Castille.

ABDULLAH AL ZAGAL-Uncle of the sultan.

AISHA AL HURRA-The mother of the sultan.

TOMÁS DE TORQUEMADA-A Castilian Dominican friar and first Grand Inquisitor.

FRANCISCO JIMÉNEZ DE CISNEROS-A Castilian cardinal and confessor of Queen Isabella.

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO-The bishop of León.

ABDULLAH-The Wattasid ruler of Morocco.

TEODEMIRO-A Mozarabic merchant.

MUSTAPHA-A loyal adviser to the sultan.

ZORAIDA-The wife of Mulay Hasan, the father of the sultan.

MORAIMA-The wife of the sultan.

THE ROYAL GUARDS OF THE CATHOLIC MONARCHS.

THE ROYAL GUARDS OF THE SULTAN.

THE SPY-The spy for the Catholic Monarchs.

THE KNIGHT-A Castilian knight.

Scene in Granada, in the year 1491- 1492 A.D.

ACT 1.

SCENE I.

At the resplendent Court of the Lions.

The sultan is outside pondering, about the imminent threat of the Castilian invasion to his kingdom. He is joined by his loyal adviser.

MUSTAPHA.

I notice an unsettling look in thine eyes sultan. What is troubling thee, if I may know?

MUHAMMAD.

How shall I prevent the downfall of the kingdom, when the Castilian Armies are nigh and control our lands? Thou art my confidant and adviser.

MUSTAPHA.

As thine adviser, I can only advise thee, but thou art the sultan.

MUHAMMAD.

Then, what dost thou suggest I do, amidst this terrible quandary that hath encompassed our kingdom?

MUSTAPHA.

We can fight my lord and die as distinguished martyrs. God be willing!

MUHAMMAD.

Or we could surrender and spare the slaughter of thousands of the citizens of Granada, as I have agreed to in our treaty, with the Catholic Monarchs. After the fall of Málaga and Baza, Almuñécar, Salobreña and Almería, we are totally alone. Unless the Turkish Sultan or the Wattasid Ruler of Morocco come to our aid, we are doomed to an inevitable defeat and loss of our ancestral homeland.

MUSTAPHA.

Dost thou wish to have an emissary sent to the Wattasid Ruler?

MUHAMMAD.

I have sent him several letters requesting his assistance, yet not once have I had any direct reply from him.

MUSTAPHA-

Perhaps 'tis better to acknowledge that we are forsaken and destined to defend our homeland alone, if needed.

MUHAMMAD.

If 'twas only my life at stake, I would die a martyr's death, but the reality is that a whole city and its inhabitants are dependent, on my decisions and actions.

MUSTAPHA.

Could we not bribe the Catholic Monarchs to permit our continuation, in the land of our ancestors with more tributary gifts?

MUHAMMAD.

I have attempted to offer them more tributary gifts that they covet, but they shall not allow the enclave of a singular Moorish Kingdom to remain, within the Iberian Peninsula. 'Tis unfortunate that I have had to sign a treaty with them, for the surrender of the city, but I had no other choice in the matter.

MUSTAPHA.

'Tis difficult to imagine our esteemed homeland in their hands.

MUHAMMAD.

I do not want to fathom that thought, but we must. What more can we do?

MUSTAPHA.

We should prepare the city, for its subsequent handover to the Christians.

MUHAMMAD.

I have to address the disconcerting citizens of Granada, as soon as possible, informing them about the Castilian Armies that march towards us and the treaty I have signed on their behalf.

MUSTAPHA.

Should we not delay that proclamation, until we are certain of the actions of the Castilian Armies?

MUHAMMAD.

Wherefore? We are certain of one thing, and that is they shall not relent, until we the Muslims are exiled from the Iberian Peninsula.

MUSTAPHA.

We are a proud people of an ancient culture and civilisation.

MUHAMMAD.

We have given throughout the centuries, this land, our knowledge, wisdom, mathematics, science, art, language and philosophy.

MUSTAPHA.

In return, they forget our valuable contributions with their ignorance and hypocrisy.

MUHAMMAD.

We are dealing, with a familiar foe that is greedy and resolute in their actions.

SCENE II.

At the spacious gardens of the Alameda,

The sultan is outside speaking to his mother, amidst the wildflowers, roses, oranges and myrtles.

AISHA AL HURRA.

I shall miss the dense wood and impressive mountains, the nightingales that sing in the early morning to us.

MUHAMMAD.

And I the running water, from the fountains and cascades, the column arcades and pools that flow majestically.

AISHA AL HURRA.

I wonder if the memory of the foundation built by the Nasrid emir Mohammed ben Al-Ahmar of the Emirate of Granada, who built the current palace and walls of the Alhambra and its conversion into a royal palace by Yusuf I, Sultan of Granada shall remain intact, even when we have left this palace.

MUHAMMAD.

That I cannot answer Mother. All that shall be a visible vestige of our ancestors shall remain, in our hearts and souls. God be willing!

AISHA AL HURRA.

I wonder also, when we are no longer present within this Royal Palace, shall we one day return to see its grand beauty preserved, as 'twas during our time here.

MUHAMMAD.

I would love nothing more than to witness that amazing fulfilment, but let us remember that no one can remove the memories within us.

AISHA AL HURRA.

What shall become of us, when our kingdom has fallen to the non-believers?

MUHAMMAD.

I fear that my legacy shall be forever tarnished, if our beloved Al Andalus shall be forgotten.

AISHA AL HURRA.

Is there nothing that we can do to prevent the seizing of our homeland?

MUHAMMAD.

I worry that the Catholic Monarchs shall not be dissuaded this time. However, I have sent an emissary to them to discuss the respectful continuation of our tributary kingdom one last time.

AISHA AL HURRA

Can we reason with them?

MUHAMMAD.

That we shall discover soon Mother.

AISHA AL HURRA.

Let us hope that we are not destined to an absolute exile.

MUHAMMAD.

I promise thee one thing, we shall not be in absolute exile in the end.

AISHA AL HURRA

The thought of that horrific outcome is unbearable to accept; even to the dreaded memory of thy late father.

MUHAMMAD.

Perhaps 'tis better to remember the days of enjoyment than to forget the days of sorrow.

AISHA AL HURRA.

If this was only feasible, my son.

MUHAMMAD.

Enough of the laden sorrow let us attempt to enjoy the wonders of nature that surround us daily.

AISHA AL HURRA.

Shalt thou take a stroll with me?

MUHAMMAD.

Of course! There is nothing more that I enjoy then to spend time, with my beloved mother.

SCENE III.

At the Palace of the Generalife.

The sultan is accompanied, by his beloved wife Moraima.

MORAIMA.

I sense a worrisome look in thine eyes suddenly.

MUHAMMAD.

I am worried, about the city falling into the hands of the Catholic Monarchs.

MORAIMA.

Dost thou believe that the city can be spared or saved?

MUHAMMAD.

That I am not completely certain, but I must believe that our city and kingdom shall not fall, into the hands of the Christians; even though there is a treaty signed.

MORAIMA.

I am thy devoted wife and queen. Wheresoever thou goest, I shall go with thee unconditionally.

MUHAMMAD.

I do not doubt one bit that thy love and devotion is of the most genuine affection.

MORAIMA.

How I wish thy mother could love me, as much as thou lovest me.

MUHAMMAD.

I sense that despite thine indifference, her affectation is genuinely present.

MORAIMA.

But 'tis not noticeable to me. How couldst thou believe that I can be a daughter to thy mother, when I am not accepted, as a real sultana in her eyes?

MUHAMMAD.

I know that my mother is difficult to understand and at times contentious, but her intentions are noble and generous.

MORAIMA.

I do not enjoy being treated indifferently, by thy mother.

MUHAMMAD.

Hast thou forgotten the callous nature of my father?

MORAIMA.

I dread to imagine that the relationship, between thy mother and I could result, in such a bitter manner, as was thy relationship with thy father.

MUHAMMAD.

I admit that my mother is not facile to accept, but I cannot afford at this moment, to bear inner conflicts that distract mine attention, when our enemy is nearby. I have had enough of the civil war and bitter strifes, amongst us Muslims.

MORAIMA.

I did not mean to trouble thee with mine inquietude. I was only expressing a humble concern on my part.

MUHAMMAD.

I fully understand that, but thou must be patient with my mother.

MORAIMA.

I shall attempt to please thee, with that earnest request.

MUHAMMAD.

Praise be to God! Thou must know thy place, within the palace.

MORAIMA.

I do thanks to God. I am thy sultana!

MUHAMMAD.

No one shall dispute that. Remember that we are a proud nobility of a centurial tradition.

MORAIMA.

Verily, I am aware of that honest admission.

MUHAMMAD.

Then, do not forget that imposing truth!

SCENE IV.

At the narrow corridor unto the Court of the Lions.

The mother of the sultan has seen that Moraima had spoken to her son.

MORAIMA.

Mother Sultana, I did not perceive thy presence.

AISHA AL HURRA.

I was taking a lovely stroll, when I saw thee speaking to the sultan.

MORAIMA.

I was comforting the sultan, during this time of uncertainty.

AISHA AL HURRA.

I want thee to know that my distrust in thee is not merely based upon who thou art, but the indisputable fact that I do not trust anyone. Ever since the betrayal of that vile woman Zoraida, the kingdom hath lost its immense power and influence, amidst our enemies.

MORAIMA.

But she is gone! She is no longer present within the palace, Mother Sultana.

AISHA AL HURRA.

Perhaps, but I do not believe that her influence hath ended at all. I shall warn thee. Do not follow the steps of that evil woman. Do not become my bitter foe, because I shall not forget thy machinations.

MORAIMA.

I have no unmissable intention to quarrel with thee. All that I want is to be the wife of my beloved husband and be there for him always, when I am required.

AISHA AL HURRA.

Then, do not involve thyself, with the public affairs of the sultan and the kingdom.

MORAIMA.

'Tis not what I seek. Nevertheless, I am the wife of a sultan. And 'tis my duty to be there for him, as I have stated. I am the sultana.

AISHA AL HURRA.

And I am the Mother Sultana, the mother of the sultan.

MORAIMA.

That I acknowledge and respect dutifully.

She bows in reverence to the mother of the sultan.

AISHA AL HURRA.

I was once a young and defiant woman, as thou art now. Therefore, I know thee well enough.

MORAIMA.

That is true! We are women of a strong character and pride.

AISHA AL HURRA.

The difference between us is that I have achieved my status and prestige, because of the praise of mine enemies. Thou hast not yet accomplish that!

MORAIMA.

I do not wish to obtain the countless enemies that thou hast.

AISHA AL HURRA.

Then demonstrate thy loyalty and appease thy sultan, every instant and request.

MORAIMA.

I shall attempt to satisfy him, as his devoted wife.

AISHA AL HURRA.

Thou must do more than that. Thou must prove to the people of Granada that thou art their sultana as well.

MORAIMA.

I shall! The people of the city shall cherish and respect me, as they do with the sultan.

AISHA AL HURRA.

Remember that the people of Granada are not the sultan.

MORAIMA.

I am fully aware of that visible distinction!

AISHA AL HURRA.

I shall be watching thee closely. Do not fail me!

SCENE V.

At the Court of the Vestibule.

The mother of the sultan speaks to the adviser of her son in privacy.

AISHA AL HURRA.

Mustapha, may I speak to thee for a few minutes?

MUSTAPHA.

Of course! Is there something wrong Mother Sultana?

AISHA AL HURRA.

I do not wish to occupy thy time with my query, but I must know, what is the possibility that we can save the city?

MUSTAPHA.

If I had the definite answer to that important question, I would immediately respond to thee with my candid honesty. However, until we have received tidings from our allies in the Ottoman Empire and the Wattasid Empire, then I can only speculate and nothing more.

AISHA AL HURRA.

What if they decide to not assist us in our hour of need?

MUSTAPHA.

I cannot reply to that particular question, except to say that our fate shall be determined, by what the Catholic Monarchs ultimately decide to do.

AISHA AL HURRA.

If that is the case, then we are most likely doomed.

MUSTAPHA.

Thou hast said it, not I!

AISHA AL HURRA.

Then our only recourse is to attempt to reason, with the Catholic Monarchs. Shall they listen to reason?

MUSTAPHA.

God be willing they shall!

AISHA AL HURRA.

Thou must guide the sultan, and I must convince the Catholic Monarchs.

MUSTAPHA.

This shall not be an easy task to accomplish my sultana.

AISHA AL HURRA.

I am well aware of that difficulty, but we are confronted with few to no other alternatives to employ. We must bide time prudently and wisely.

MUSTAPHA.

I agree, yet we are not guaranteed, any undeniable success.

AISHA AL HURRA.

If we can delay the advance of their armies, then we would have time to convince our Muslim allies to succour us.

MUSTAPHA.

'Twould be a logical premise to surmise, but time doth not depend on the mere actions of others.

AISHA AL HURRA.

Thou art a brilliant philosopher.

MUSTAPHA.

Philosophy is often reflected, within the actions we commit.

AISHA AL HURRA.

Let us hope that we are successful in our endeavour to stop the halt of the Christian Armies.

MUSTAPHA.

God be willing!

SCENE VI.

At the upper chamber of the Alhambra.

The sultan is in his bedchamber alone meditating, until he is interrupted, by one of the Royal Guards.

MUHAMMAD.

What hath caused thee to abruptly interrupt my quietude?

THE ROYAL GUARD.

Pardon mine intrusion sultan. We have intercepted an assassin on the grounds of the palace.

MUHAMMAD.

Where is he? Is he alive?

THE ROYAL GUARD.

Nay! He is dead!

MUHAMMAD.

Why was he killed and not brought immediately before me?

THE ROYAL GUARD.

We were not able to capture him in time.

MUHAMMAD.

Explain?

THE ROYAL GUARD.

When we had attempted to seize him, he had taken his life with celerity.

MUHAMMAD.

Did the assassin utter any words, before his death?

THE ROYAL GUARD.

None that were audible to our ears!

MUHAMMAD.

Wert thou able to retrieve anything of pertinence from him afterwards?

THE ROYAL GUARD.

Only the weapon that he had carried in his hands!

MUHAMMAD.

Where is the weapon at now?

The bloody weapon is handed to the sultan.

THE ROYAL GUARD.

Here 'tis for thou to see.

MUHAMMAD.

This dagger is unfamiliar to me. I have never seen a dagger of this design.

THE ROYAL GUARD.

'Tis the dagger of an assassin from Morocco.

MUHAMMAD.

An assassin!

THE ROYAL GUARD.

Who could have sent the assassin to murder thee?

MUHAMMAD.

Unfortunately, I have numerous enemies!

THE ROYAL GUARD.

What shall we do with the body of the assassin?

MUHAMMAD.

Get rid of it straightaway!

THE ROYAL GUARD.

I shall my sultan!

ACT 2.

SCENE I.

At the Royal Chamber of the Alcázar. The Catholic Monarchs are together, seated upon their palatial thrones. They have received the emissary of the sultan and addressed him. He was dismissed and then returned to the Royal Palace in Granada, but not before witnessing the torture chambers in the tower and the chamber of the Inquisition that had horrified him.

ISABELLA.

What are we to surmise of the visit of the emissary of the last Nasrid ruler of the Emirate of Granada?

FERDINAND.

It appeareth that the sultan is attempting to obtain our grace and persuasion.

ISABELLA.

'Tis a desperate move on his part I surmise.

FERDINAND.

Desperate indeed, but 'tis his only recourse left.

ISABELLA.

Then am I to assume that the sultan is reasonable and not merely desperate?

FERDINAND.

I would be incline to admit that he is both at the moment.

ISABELLA.

The question that I have is, what shall he do next?

FERDINAND.

That is a very intriguing question.

ISABELLA.

And what is the answer to that particular question?

FERDINAND.

I believe that the sultan shall attempt to seek assistance from the Ottoman Turks and Moors in Fez. We cannot disregard their possible involvement in the matter.

ISABELLA.

Is that the existential reason that we have delayed the recapture of the city of Granada?

FERDINAND.

Partially, but 'tis a tactic that the sultan is employing. I want for the sultan to believe that.

ISABELLA.

Yes, I understand that point! If we convince the sultan that we are cautious or fearful of the involvement of the others, then we could deceive him to believe that we shall postpone our attack.

FERDINAND.

We are biding time, as he is, with only one major exception. We shall not tarry our attack for long.

ISABELLA.

If we make, the infidels believe that we are willing to spare their kingdom, then they shall be susceptible to our attack.

FERDINAND.

All that is relevant is that they capitulate in the end, as indicated in the treaty.

ISABELLA.

We have waited for so long to rid our lands of the Moors and now we are close to achieving our prime objective.

FERDINAND.

Soon, we shall be rid of all the Moors in our lands and kingdoms.

ISABELLA.

First Córdoba then Seville, Málaga, Baza, Almuñécar, Salobreña and Almería were recaptured.

FERDINAND.

All that remaineth is the Moorish city of Granada.

ISABELLA.

And it shall be a celebrated prize and return.

FERDINAND.

It shall become Christian once more!

SCENE II.

At the courtyard of the Royal Palace.

The queen greets the bishop of León, who has visited the kings in Córdoba.

ISABELLA.

'Tis always a tremendous pleasure to see thee afresh bishop. What hast brought thee to Córdoba?

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

And for me 'tis an honour to be bestowed by thine eminent presence, my queen. As for the specific reason that hath brought me to Córdoba. Thou knowest that we are eager to know, when shall the city of Granada belong to us again?

ISABELLA.

Anon, and we the Catholic Monarchs shall rule over all of Hispania, as 'tis our manifest destiny.

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

We the Catholic Church that serve thee and thy loyal subjects are appreciative, for thy dedication to the cause of the Reconquest.

ISABELLA.

Know one thing bishop, for over five centuries, mine ancestors have fought to rid our lands of the Infidels.

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

And the Catholic Church is truly in debt to the monarchs for that laudable endeavour.

ISABELLA.

The acquisition of the enclave of Granada shall bring the church reward and our brethren the prestige that was lost at the Battle of Guadalete in 711 A.D. of our Lord.

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

The church hath always been thy constant follower and supporter, my queen.

ISABELLA.

I am well aware of that fact bishop, and I am certain Pope Innocent VIII shall be happy to receive the tidings of the infidel's defeat and recapture of the city of Granada.

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

There shall be nothing more gratifying than that to our gracious pope. He shall want to come, but we dare not risk his safety. 'Tis, not safe for him to come yet.

ISABELLA.

Once we have recaptured the city, then tell the pope that he is cordially invited to visit the city and us in Córdoba.

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

I shall, and he shall be expecting thy success. I am certain of that my queen.

ISABELLA.

There is much to accomplish in the way of indoctrinating the Infidels to our devoted Catholic faith.

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

I shall be delighted to assume that task. We are prepared at the church to convert the ungodly infidels to Christianity.

ISABELLA.

I know the church shall not fail me, and I trust that thou shall not as well.

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

Of course not!

ISABELLA.

Thou must be weary from thy long trip from León.

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

I am indeed my queen! I am not accustomed to travel lately, through such extensive countryside.

ISABELLA.

I shall have one of the servants prepare thy stay in one of the chambers in the palace. Afterwards, when thou hast rested, I would love to hear more about thy trip.

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

I am sincerely blest, for thy kind invitation and hospitality!

SCENE III.

At the Reception Hall of the Royal Palace.

One of the Castilian knights of nobility that is in charge of the Castilian Army speaks to the Catholic Monarchs in person.

FERDINAND.

Come forth! What hast thou come to tell us?

The knight bows in reverence, before the Catholic Monarchs.

THE KNIGHT.

I have come to inform thee that our magnificent army is prepared to make the final assault on the city of Granada, as was originally planned.

FERDINAND.

That is excellent tidings, and this revelation shall inspire the men even more.

THE KNIGHT.

Verily, the men are already inspired, my lord.

ISABELLA.

Exactly, how many men are at our command?

THE KNIGHT.

Presently, we have 12,000 men in our army and ranks.

ISABELLA.

'Tis enough to overtake the Moors?

THE KNIGHT.

I believe so! The Moors are no more than 4,000 men of infantry.

FERDINAND.

Dost thou know with certainty how many men are protecting the palace and city?

THE KNIGHT.

I am afraid, I have not been able to determine that at his moment.

FERDINAND.

Then, we must know that at once, before we depart to Granada.

THE KNIGHT.

What dost thou suggest we do my lord?

ISABELLA.

May I interpose my king?

FERDINAND.

Proceed!

ISABELLA.

Perhaps, a spy could be sent to infiltrate the city.

FERDINAND.

That is an excellent idea. I should have thought of that before.

ISABELLA.

But it cannot be a mere stranger.

FERDINAND.

What dost thou mean?

ISABELLA.

'Tis apparent that, if we are to succeed with the infiltration to the palace and city, then we must choose someone from within the city itself.

FERDINAND.

Is that, not too dangerous to employ as a tactic?

ISABELLA.

It could be, but I am highly confident that we could find our spy in the end.

FERDINAND.

Then, I shall instruct the knight to return to find us a spy, amongst the many Granadans in the city.

ISABELLA.

Remember the Granadans are mostly crippled, by internal conflict and civil war, whilst we the Christians are generally unified. The sultan broke off his vassalage and rebelled against us in the first place.

FERDINAND.

We must continue to employ our effective use of artillery that hath avoided long sieges. With the bulk of the troops and funds for the war.

ISABELLA.

And our naval collaboration, guns, and financial loans.

SCENE IV.

At the chapel of the Alcázar.

The queen enters the chapel to find the Bishop of León.

ISABELLA.

I did not mean to interrupt abruptly, thy prayers.

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

There is no need to apologise, my queen. I was merely praying for the poor souls of Granada and the ultimate success of thy campaign.

ISABELLA.

The church hath a lot to be thankful these days; ever since we have diminished the power of the bourgeoise and nobility, because of us. The Catholic Church hath become a very powerful entity that hath profited well.

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

And the Catholic Church is in debt to the Catholic Monarchs, for their welcomed generosity.

ISABELLA.

I am sanguine that the church shall be capable of converting the Moors into proper Christians.

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

The conversion of the infidels is our priority!

ISABELLA.

We cannot forget the faithful Christian community that hath remained, during the Moorish occupation of our lands.

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

If thou art referring to the so-called Mozarabic community, then we have not. And the Jews?

ISABELLA.

Anyone of the infidels that doth not convert shall be exiled or executed, including the Jews.

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

And the inquisition?

ISABELLA.

Thou hast inquisitorial power granted by the Catholic Monarchs, until determined otherwise. Therefore, the inquisition shall continue its vital course.

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

Thou knowest that we the Catholic Church are prepared to restore the Catholic faith in Granada. I speak for the pope when I acknowledge that our faith in Christ must triumph over the Infidels abroad too.

ISABELLA.

What art thou insinuating bishop?

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

We have heard about the Portuguese adventures into Asia.

ISABELLA.

I have heard the same tidings mentioned ere. What is thy point?

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

Then thou knowest that we must not allow the Portuguese our arch enemies to claim the new territories, in the name of Portugal.

ISABELLA.

That is the last thing I want. However, at the moment, until Granada is truly liberated and the Moors are driven from Hispania, then any foreign voyage of conquest shall have to wait.

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

I am in concurrence with that analogy my noble queen.

ISABELLA.

There are countless treasures that await us abroad, but first, are the treasures of Granada.

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

Let us pray for that eventuality, in the name of Christ our divine saviour.

ISABELLA.

Let us pray indeed!

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

May God grant us victory over the infidels!

SCENE V.

At the Reception Hall.

The Catholic Monarchs entertain the Bishop of León, with a private gathering of the nobility of Córdoba upon that eventide.

FERDINAND.

We are all gathered together to commemorate the victories against the Moors. Let us, then enjoy this delightful night.

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

With the grace of God, the land of Hispania shall be Catholic once more. When the city of Granada is Christian, then the might and main of the Catholic Monarchs shall be consolidated.

FERDINAND.

Soon that accomplishment shall be effectuated. Rest assure my bishop I promise thee and every one present that the next time we reunite gentlemen, it shall be to celebrate our sensational triumph.

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

The Catholic Church shall be in the forefront of that successful triumph my king.

FERDINAND.

Must I remind thee bishop that, without the power of the monarchs, the power of the church is rendered devoid of any practical influence?

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

I would not dare to refute that claim or contradict thee my king. However, the Catholic Church's influence extendeth, beyond thy kingdom and originateth from the sacred papacy of Rome.

ISABELLA.

Pardon the king bishop, but the king was merely attempting to convey the point that with our sacrifice, the Catholic Church hath evolved, as a strong presence in Western Europe beginning with the holy pope.

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

I understand my queen and the Catholic Church and in particular the pope is appreciative of its Royal subjects.

ISABELLA.

We do not mean to displeaseth the pope.

FERDINAND.

The pope must now adhere to our voices and our growing demands, for our salient contributions.

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

With all due respects, my king, the pope is beyond any demands that exceed his own in Rome.

FERDINAND.

Rome my good bishop is far away from these lands and what belongeth to Hispania shall be governed, by its royal subjects that are actual members that have inherited of all these lands, including the reconquered lands that belonged to the oppressive Moors.

ISABELLA.

The Moors' reign over our lands shall come to an abrupt end.

FERDINAND.

That I do not doubt one bit.

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

I shall hope to be there at Granada, when the city is ours again.

ISABELLA.

Be patience bishop!

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

I shall be, my earnest queen.

ISABELLA.

Thou shalt be informed, about the reconquest of Granada.

FERDINAND.

Perhaps 'twould be better, if the bishop was escorted to the Tower of the Lions to question the Infidels that have been charged, with conspiracy against the Catholic Faith.

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

By all means! I am committed to do God's work.

ISABELLA.

Thou shalt discover in the dispositions given about the accused that there are many people of Córdoba and its province that are secretively fervent Musulmans and Jews.

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

We at the Catholic Church are prepared to convert them into practising Catholics. The inquisition hath been proven to be the only manner that these poor misguided souls find their spiritual path in life, through our Lord and saviour Jesus Christ.

ISABELLA.

We too have reached the same conclusion. Art thou prepared for this undertaking?

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

I am prepared to do the duty that hath been appointed to me!

SCENE VI.

At the Royal Chamber.

Isabella has returned afterwards to the chamber, where Ferdinand is waiting.

ISABELLA.

I did not mean to keep thee waiting for me.

FERDINAND.

Our avid bishop is a feisty little fellow. What dost thou think of our guest?

ISABELLA.

Perhaps his character is a bit imposing, but he hath served our cause religiously.

FERDINAND.

I find his insolence to be distasteful and undaunted. I am somewhat suspicious of his argument and above all the pope's intentions, when we have regained the peninsula.

ISABELLA.

I would not worry about the bishop. However, I too am anxious to know what are the actual intentions of the pope.

FERDINAND.

We must be prepared, for whatever challenges lie ahead to confront, as an obstacle.

ISABELLA.

We cannot dismiss the undeniable authority of the papacy.

FERDINAND.

I am well aware of that, but I shall not sacrifice all that we have gained, not even to the pope in Rome.

ISABELLA.

Thou must be careful that thy words, not be misconstrued as utter blasphemy.

FERDINAND.

Blasphemy! Dost thou forget that we shall be the absolute rulers of Hispania soon.

ISABELLA.

And the church? They are a viable power and association to our just cause.

FERDINAND.

In sooth! Nevertheless, I shall continue our perfect association. As they shall provide moral and financial backing to our campaign, we shall provide them access to more converts to the Catholic faith and the bulk of the army of Christ.

ISABELLA.

Therefore, our alliance is of a mutual allegiance to the cause?

FERDINAND.

Exactly my dear! There is no better convenience than ours.

ISABELLA.

There is so much yet to be done, after we have recaptured Granada. The Moors and Jews shall not all go willingly.

FERDINAND.

The selection shall be simple, either convert to Christianity, be exiled or imprisoned for heresy.

ISABELLA.

We must appear to be merciful to the Moors and Jews.

FERDINAND.

Merciful! We have been merciful for too long. It hath taken us centuries to unite against the Moors. Now, we have them at our mercy.

ISABELLA.

We shall accomplish what our forefathers failed to accomplish centuries ago.

FERDINAND.

And we shall be there to witness the downfall of the last kingdom of the Moors in our abundant territory.

ISABELLA.

When that day arriveth, history shall chronicle that momentous occasion.

FERDINAND.

It shall be a glorious occasion indeed that history shall record.

ACT 3.

SCENE I.

At the Hall of the Ambassadors at the Alhambra.

The emissary of the sultan has returned to Granada, with the immediate reply of the Catholic Monarchs. The tidings are not what the sultan had hoped for.

MUHAMMAD.

What tidings hast thou brought me, from the Catholic Monarchs?

EMISSARY.

Unfortunately, the tidings are not good my noble sultan.

The emissary hands the letter sealed, by the Catholic Monarchs to the sultan.

MUHAMMAD.

There is no option, but total capitulation, as stated in the treaty agreed. They insist that we hand them the keys of the city and offer an exile, near the Alpujarras Mountains.

EMISSARY.

That would seem to be the case. However, there is more. We are obligated to renounce our claim to Hispania.

MUHAMMAD.

In essence, renounce our past and historical attachment to the lands of the Iberian Peninsula that once were conquered by our forefathers.

EMISSARY.

Exactly!

MUHAMMAD.

The total ruination of our brethren and the elimination of our history, language, culture and religion. For what purpose?

EMISSARY.

There are written stipulations in the conditions offered, by the Catholic Monarchs.

MUHAMMAD.

I have read those conditions in the treaty and are appalled, by the lack of respect.

EMISSARY.

They shall allow safe passage to thee and naturally, all the residents of the city that are Muslim and Jew. Henceforth, any Muslim or Jew that remaineth shall be allowed to keep and practise their faith openly, without any aggressive pressure or unjustifiable intimidation.

MUHAMMAD.

They have betrayed our allegiance and everything that I have done on their behalf. I was a witless man to trust them so foolhardily!

EMISSARY.

I am only thine humble messenger, my sultan.

MUHAMMAD.

Is there anything else that thou must disclose to me?

EMISSARY.

The might of the Christian Army with all due respect my sultan is superior to our army. I have seen their strength in numbers and cringe in horror.

MUHAMMAD.

Regrettably, that I had expected beforehand.

EMISSARY.

But their horrific cruelty and disdain for our Muslim people, I have witnessed in person and I must attest that their mercy towards us is strictly political.

MUHAMMAD.

In what manner?

EMISSARY.

In the ineffable form of their brutal inquisition.

MUHAMMAD.

I have heard of this effective measure of interrogation, yet I must admit that I am fascinated to know more.

EMISSARY.

They utilise every horrible form of human torture possible. I have written and drawn these images that I saw personally.

The sultan is shocked by what he reads and sees and remarks.

MUHAMMAD.

Now, I know the Machiavellian manoeuvres of the adversaries that I am facing.

SCENE II.

At the Court of the Vestibule.

The sultan and his mother are engaged in a intense conversation, anent the mysterious assassin that had attempted to kill the sultan recently.

AISHA AL HURRA.

I was informed that there was an assassin that attempted to kill thee. Is that correct?

MUHAMMAD.

Who hast informed thee, about the assassin?

AISHA AL HURRA.

That is not relevant. What is to me is that someone hath attempted to murder thee with discernible intrepidity.

MUHAMMAD.

The truth is that an assassin had entered the grounds to assassinate me, but he killed himself, before we could capture him.

AISHA AL HURRA.

I am extremely relieved that nothing baleful happened to thee, my son.

MUHAMMAD.

What I do not know with total clarity mother is who sent the assassin in the first place?

AISHA AL HURRA.

It could be anyone that despiseth thee. Thou hast various enemies; even thine uncle Abdullah, the brother of thy father could have sent this assassin to murder thee.

MUHAMMAD.

But he is in exile. Why would thou believest that the assassin was sent by him?

AISHA AL HURRA.

I do not have any solid evidence to confirm that compelling suspicion. However, we both are aware of his noticeable hatred for us.

MUHAMMAD.

I cannot deny that, but until I have gathered enough proof, then I cannot dismiss any of my foes so lightly.

AISHA AL HURRA.

It would seem that we cannot trust no one any longer. Who is our ally from our enemy?

MUHAMMAD.

How can we reconcile the past with the future?

AISHA AL HURRA.

Perhaps we cannot, yet we must stand and fight for our present.

MUHAMMAD.

If only that was feasible to attain.

AISHA AL HURRA.

Thou art the sultan, the transparent personification of a great Islamic leader.

MUHAMMAD.

I am afraid of the strong possibility that our Muslim allies shall not stand and fight with us in the end.

AISHA AL HURRA.

If this be the case, then we must prepare ourselves, for this eventual outcome.

MUHAMMAD.

How can I prepare the city for its capture and worse, how can I prepare myself, for the rude awakening of the downfall of Al Andalus?

AISHA AL HURRA.

Al Andalus is gone! There is no more Al Andalus, my son. What is left is the Emirate of Granada that remaineth of that wondrous past.

MUHAMMAD.

To contemplate that dreaded reality into words is an unfathomable utterance of doom.

AISHA AL HURRA.

Whatever occurreth to us, we cannot allow our prestige to be tarnished disgracefully.

MUHAMMAD.

I give my word that I shall not shame thee or my glorious ancestors mother.

SCENE III.

At the Hall of the Abencerrajes.

The sultan speaks in seclusion, with his loyal adviser about the response given by the Catholic Monarchs.

MUSTAPHA.

I came at once, my noble sultan.

MUHAMMAD.

I have received a disturbing letter by the Catholic Monarchs.

MUSTAPHA.

What was in the letter that hath unsettled thee presently?

MUHAMMAD.

The Catholic Monarchs have rejected the inducement to continue the prior agreement that we had established, amongst each other. They have attached grave conditions to their terms and treaty.

MUSTAPHA.

What conditions, if I may query?

MUHAMMAD.

For three years, Muslims could emigrate and return freely. They shall be allowed to keep weapons, although not firearms. No one shall be forced to change religion, not even former Christians who had converted to Islam. They offer money and the rulership of a small principality in the mountainous Alpujarras, as my considerable consolation; although I know that they shall not keep their word for much time.

MUSTAPHA.

Why hast thou not accepted their demands of paying more tribute before?

MUHAMMAD.

Because lands that had been promised to me were being administered by Castile. That is the main reason that I broke off my vassalage with them, and moreover, they shall not accept the continuation of our tributary state.

MUSTAPHA.

Perchance, we should have thought things more prudently?

MUHAMMAD.

Art thou questioning, my judgement?

MUSTAPHA.

Not at all, my noble sultan.

MUHAMMAD.

Then?

MUSTAPHA.

I am merely stating the other option.

MUHAMMAD.

Explain!

MUSTAPHA.

We know that the Catholic Monarchs only want Granada, for the purpose of obtaining the immense wealth of the city.

MUHAMMAD.

What immense wealth?

MUSTAPHA.

They have the general assumption that we conceal a massive wealth.

MUHAMMAD.

'Tis not enough that our city is being taxed daily by them?

MUSTAPHA.

How long shall the subterfuge continue its course?

MUHAMMAD.

Until the Catholic Monarchs realise that we are too weak to defend the city properly.

SCENE IV.

At the gallery of the Upper Alhambra.

The sultan has reunited with the sultana.

MORAIMA.

What is troubling thee, my loyal sultan?

MUHAMMAD.

I have received a letter from the Catholic Monarchs, indicating that they shall not be content, with continuing our current agreement.

MORAIMA.

Then, what shall betide to us and to the citizens of the Emirate of the sultan?

MUHAMMAD.

I have not come to the conclusion yet that we are doomed to an inevitable fate.

MORAIMA.

What else can be done?

MUHAMMAD.

I have sent requests to our Muslim allies.

MORAIMA.

And what have they replied in return?

MUHAMMAD.

At the moment, I have not received an official reply, but I am sanguine that we shall be aided by our allies.

MORAIMA.

If not, my sultan?

MUHAMMAD.

I shall not allow for our kingdom to be destroyed, without a gallant attempt to preserve it.

MORAIMA.

I worry that our way of living shall change sadly.

MUHAMMAD.

Whatever occureth, know that we shall continue to be together, amidst all forms of adversity.

MORAIMA.

I shall go wheresoever thou goest, my sultan!

MUHAMMAD.

And I with thee, my sultana.

MORAIMA.

Let us pray that we shall never be apart.

MUHAMMAD.

God be willing!

MORAIMA.

What shall happen to our beloved palace?

MUHAMMAD.

If we are driven from our lands in the end, I shall construct another Alhambra, even more spectacular than the original I promise.

MORAIMA.

I do not care, as long as I am with thee always.

MUHAMMAD.

And I with thee, my beautiful sultana!

SCENE V.

At the Hall of Justice.

A merchant by the name of Teodemiro Panucea has been apprehended for being a spy. He is quickly brought before the sultan.

MUHAMMAD.

State thy name and profession.

TEODEMIRO.

I am Teodemiro Panucea, a humble merchant, my noble sultan.

MUHAMMAD.

Thou wert arrested, under the charge of spying. What dost thou have to declare about this significant accusation, against thee?

TEODEMIRO.

I am totally innocent of these accusatory charges.

MUHAMMAD.

Then, why would thee be accused of being a spy?

TEODEMIRO.

That I do not know the reason.

MUHAMMAD.

What evidence hast thou to disprove the serious charges?

TEODEMIRO.

What evidence is there to prove my apparent guilt?

MUHAMMAD.

What dost thou mean by those exact words?

TEODEMIRO.

I am stating the obvious my noble sultan. I am only a merchant and not a spy.

MUHAMMAD.

Thou art a Christian or Mozarab?

TEODEMIRO.

Yes! I am a Christian.

MUHAMMAD.

Thou speakest Arabic well.

TEODEMIRO.

Although my first language is Latinia, I have learnt Andalusian Arabic.

MUHAMMAD.

Thou art a merchant?

TEODEMIRO.

Yes, my noble sultan!

MUHAMMAD.

Thou wert observed speaking to a Castilian merchant, about the purchase of fine weaponry.

TEODEMIRO.

That I do not gainsay. However, the purchase was never made.

MUHAMMAD.

Why?

TEODEMIRO.

Because, I did not have the weaponry that was being asked by the nobleman.

MUHAMMAD.

What was asked by this nobleman?

TEODEMIRO.

Arquebuses and gun powder!

MUHAMMAD.

How long hast thou lived in the city?

TEODEMIRO.

I was born in Granada, and my family derived from this ancient city. I have lived all my life here and shall hope to be buried here, if God be willing.

MUHAMMAD.

I shall dismiss thee for now, but if 'tis proven that art conniving with our enemies, then thou shall be executed. Is that fully understood?

TEODEMIRO.

Indeed, my sultan! I am a lawful citizen of Granada.

SCENE VI.

At the Palace of the Watassid Ruler. The sultan of the Kingdom of Fez has finished receiving the emissary of the sultan of Granada. Afterwards, he speaks to Abdullah Ez Zagal, the exiled uncle of the sultan.

ABDULLAH.

It appeareth that the situation, with thy nephew is a grave matter Abdullah. And now he is requesting my direct participation. The Catholic Monarchs are on the verge of taking the city of Granada.

ABDULLAH EZ ZAGAL.

Ever since I was overtaken by his seditious act, 'twas a matter of time, before the kingdom fell to the non-believers.

ABDULLAH.

What dost thou recommend I do in the matter?

ABDULLAH EZ ZAGAL.

I would forsake him to his fate, as he did with me unmercifully.

ABDULLAH.

I agree! Any son that dethroneth his uncle is not worthy of mine assistance.

ABDULLAH EZ ZAGAL.

I cannot forget his abandonment in Málaga and the many men that died defending the garrison and city with such bravery.

ABDULLAH.

What shall become of thy nephew?

ABDULLAH EZ ZAGAL.

That dependeth on what he decideth to do, and what the Catholic Monarchs permit him.

ABDULLAH.

I wonder, if that humiliation would not send him to his dishonourable death.

ABDULLAH EZ ZAGAL.

I would enjoy nothing more than to see that treacherous traitor destitute and dethroned.

ABDULLAH.

We shall soon know the result and aftermath.

ABDULLAH EZ ZAGAL.

I only wish that I was there to witness his eternal shame in person.

ABDULLAH.

His shame shall be enough to cause his gradual ruin.

ABDULLAH EZ ZAGAL.

It shall be retribution, for the injustice that was done to me.

ABDULLAH.

I cannot risk the stability of my kingdom, with a haunting defeat at Granada.

ABDULLAH EZ ZAGAL.

Thou must not display weakness, amidst thy foes here in the region.

ABDULLAH.

I shall not! I cannot afford any men to be sent abroad.

ABDULLAH EZ ZAGAL.

The army of the Catholic Monarchs are too strong in numbers.

ABDULLAH.

I wonder, if they shall settle with Granada and not want to expand into Northern Africa with their aspirations of glory.

ABDULLAH EZ ZAGAL.

They shall not dare to invade the kingdom of Fez, my sultan.

SCENE VII.

At the Court of the Myrtles.

The sultan is becoming more suspicious of his enemies, including his traditional ones. He speaks to his mother perplexed and despondent.

MUHAMMAD.

Mother, I did not see thee approach me.

AISHA AL HURRA.

Thou hast a pensive expression on thy countenance that is upsetting, my son.

MUHAMMAD.

The emissary hath returned with the most terrible tidings.

AISHA AL HURRA.

What exactly art thou referring to my son that I may be apprised of its relevance?

MUHAMMAD.

The Sultan of Egypt hath only mildly rebuked the Catholic Monarchs for the Granada War, but the Mamelukes that rule Egypt are in a constant war with the Ottoman Turks. As the Catholic Monarchs are fellow enemies of the Turks, the Sultan hath no desire to break their profitable alliance against the Turks. As for the requested aid from the Kingdom of Fez, the sultan hath rejected mine impassioned plea for assistance, citing the turmoil in the area. He cannot send us any actual reinforcements. Therefore, we are destined to defend the Emirate alone on our own.

AISHA AL HURRA.

Without any help from our Muslim allies, we are doomed it would seem.

MUHAMMAD.

I shall attempt to defend the city, with every last man standing, if we are attacked.

AISHA AL HURRA.

That shall not sufficeth! More men shall be required for the defence of the palace.

MUHAMMAD.

I shall offer any foreign soldier from outside the kingdom a handsome reward, for their participation in the necessary defence of the city.

AISHA AL HURRA.

We must send another emissary to the Catholic Monarchs. Perhaps I could go instead and persuade them to not attack the city.

MUHAMMAD.

Nay! Their terms for surrender were clear and understood by me, with their treaty and letter.

AISHA AL HURRA.

But I must attempt. Surely as one queen to another, the queen of Aragón shall be less inflexible than the king of Castile.

MUHAMMAD.

Under normal circumstances, I would consent to such suggestion. However, the Catholic Monarchs cannot be reasoned. They are determined to capture the city and drive us out from our lands afterwards.

AISHA AL HURRA.

We cannot permit this horrible occurrence. There must be another manner that we could convince them.

MUHAMMAD.

Regrettably, there is no turning back I sense. I shall prepare the inhabitants of the city.

AISHA AL HURRA.

The inhabitants shall be unnerved and dread the actions of the Christian Armies. What shall happen to the city? Their soldiers shall carouse and loot the city, depleting its value.

MUHAMMAD.

That I do not doubt!

AISHA AL HURRA.

Do not forget what hath transpired in the city of Málaga, my son.

MUHAMMAD.

I have not forgotten that at all! The memory is still burning in my soul, like an inextinguishable flame.

AISHA AL HURRA.

We must be totally prepared, for whatever occurreth to the city, to the palace and to us!

MUHAMMAD.

I shall be prepared!

AISHA AL HURRA.

The servants of the Alhambra must be prepared also.

ACT 4.

SCENE I.

At the Gardens of the Alcázar, amidst the palm, cypress, orange and lemon trees. The day before the harrowing capitulation of the city of Granada.

The queen of Aragón is present, with the Bishop of León.

ISABELLA.

I have an important announcement to disclose to thee bishop.

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

I am eager to know, my queen.

ISABELLA.

We are resolute in retaking the city of Granada and ending the long rule of the Moors in Hispania.

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

That hath been our principal aspiration for several centuries.

ISABELLA.

Anon, it shall become a reality that we must procure its manifest attainment.

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

I pray that the Good Lord heareth our divine supplication in the end.

ISABELLA.

I know that our ambition is shared by the church.

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

The Catholic Church shall assist in whatever capacity is needed to bring Christ to the infidels.

ISABELLA.

We have strived to unite the Catholic kingdoms, under the faithful banner of Christendom.

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

And the Catholic Church is forever grateful for that great unity, my queen.

ISABELLA.

A new beginning is beyond the horizon bishop.

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

I have sent a letter to the pope informing him, about the situation in Granada.

ISABELLA.

I am certain that the pope shall be more than pleased to know of the eventual recapture of Granada.

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

Forsooth, my queen! There is nothing more satisfactory to the Catholic Church than the recapture of Granada.

ISABELLA.

Shalt thou be remaining in Córdoba for much longer?

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

I have received direct instructions from the pope in Rome that I must stay in Córdoba, until the city of Granada hath been retaken.

ISABELLA.

Thou art a bidden guest to the Alcázar and free to stay here, until thy departure.

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

I am thankful for thy noble gesture and cordiality.

ISABELLA.

And we are thankful for the moral support of the church always. Now, I must return to my chamber.

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

And I must continue the inquisition of the prisoners.

SCENE II.

At the Tower of the Lions.

A Royal Guard has come to speak to the King of Castile therewith.

ROYAL GUARD.

I do not mean to interrupt thee my king, but someone hath asked to see thee.

FERDINAND.

Who is this peculiar individual?

ROYAL GUARD.

That I do not know, but he hath said that 'tis an urgent matter that must be addressed.

FERDINAND.

Then bring him at once and do not delay!

ROYAL GUARD.

I shall bring him to thee, as thou hast requested.

FERDINAND.

I shall be waiting for him at the tower.

The individual arrives, and it is the spy that has returned from Granada.

THE ROYAL GUARD.

Here is the man that hath requested to see thee, my king!

FERDINAND.

Excellent! Thou art excused.

THE ROYAL GUARD.

Yes my king!

FERDINAND.

Thou art the spy sent to Granada?

THE SPY.

Yes, my king!

FERDINAND.

What tidings hast thou to disclose to me that is of the utmost urgency?

THE SPY.

I have received from my source within the Moorish Palace of the Alhambra that the sultan's request for immediate assistance, from his Muslim allies hath been completely rejected.

FERDINAND.

Thou art certain that the Mamelukes in Egypt shall not send an army?

THE SPY.

From the source mentioned, the Mamelukes shall not involve themselves in the matter.

FERDINAND.

And the Ottoman Turks?

THE SPY.

It appeareth that the Sultan Bayezid II is frankly, too occupied with the Venetians, and the pope shall direct his lingering concern for the Turks, after the fall of Granada.

FERDINAND.

We cannot afford to dismiss the involvement of the Ottoman Turks.

THE SPY.

My honour, I tell thee that the Turks despise Boabdil, as much as thou dost.

FERDINAND.

If that is true, then we must not delay the charge to Granada. Thou hast not told me the name of that reliable source within the Moorish Palace.

THE SPY.

I shall reveal the name in due time, but we cannot jeopardise the plan. What I can reveal about our source is that this person is a loyal and intimate confidant to the sultan. Thou art mindful of the attentive ears of thine enemies.

FERDINAND.

Of course! There could be spies amongst us lurking, within the palace, without our perceptive notice.

THE SPY.

The Moors are defenceless, my king. Now is the hour to strike and conquer Granada.

FERDINAND.

I shall commence the order to attack the city. I have given in my letter to the sultan our instructions in the surrender of the city and palace. I hope that our Moorish friend dost not dare to confront us in battle and honoureth the treaty.

THE SPY.

If he doth my king, he shall definitely be defeated!

FERDINAND.

There is no doubt whatever that this shall be ultimately, the case and victory shall be ours!

SCENE III.

At the Reception Hall.

The Catholic Monarchs are visited, by an unannounced visitor that both have heard mentioned.

The visitor is the widow and sultana of the late Mulay Hassan, the father of the sultan.

FERDINAND.

Am I to believe thou art the widow of Mulay Hassan, the once sultan of the emirate of Granada?

ZORAIDA.

I am Zoraida, the widow of the deceased Mulay Hassan.

ISABELLA.

If thou art the widow of the late sultan, then why art thou here before us, upon this day?

ZORAIDA.

I am here before ye, because I must speak about a very urgent matter.

ISABELLA.

What is this urgent matter that thou must bespeak?

ZORAIDA.

'Tis about the sultan, the son of my late husband.

FERDINAND.

What exactly about the sultan must we know about?

ZORAIDA.

I have come to tell thee that the sultan is surrounded by enemies and the city is suffering.

ISABELLA.

And why dost that concerneth us?

ZORAIDA.

The city of Granada is under a tremendous economic pressure.

FERDINAND.

We are fully aware of the situation in the city.

ZORAIDA.

What I beseech ye is not for the sake of the sultan, but for the sake of the manifold inhabitants of the city that are not a part of the centurial conflict, between ye and the sultan.

ISABELLA.

What dost thou propose we do?

ZORAIDA.

I propose naught. All I ask is that the city and the palace be spared.

FERDINAND.

That is all?

ZORAIDA.

Yes! Naturally, I do not impose this supplication upon ye instead, I come in good faith to speak, on behalf of the suffering Granadans.

ISABELLA.

What dost thou gain, from this singular and modest request?

ZORAIDA.

Believe me my noble queen, when I asseverate that my request is only to save the good people of Granada.

FERDINAND.

I would interpret thy request, as a formal demand.

ZORAIDA.

'Tis not a demand, my king.

ISABELLA.

What do we gain from this request?

ZORAIDA.

I cannot guarantee ye any measure of gold or wealth in return. I come before ye, as a queen and speak with my words as such queen.

FERDINAND.

Who sent thee?

ZORAIDA.

No one! I came alone in the act of peace and hope to leave alone, on my own accord.

ISABELLA.

Thou art free to leave on thine own accord. 'Tis our intention to spare the city and the palace. The question is shall the sultan honour our agreement for total capitulation?

ZORAIDA.

I pray that be the case in the end!

SCENE IV.

At the Royal chamber of the Catholic Monarchs.

Two months have passed, since a letter was sent to the sultan, informing him about the agreement for the capitulation of the city of Granada. The Sultan's response is known, with a letter that is handed to the king, by one of the Royal Guards.

FERDINAND.

We now have the guarantee we needed to take the city. The sultan has finally capitulated!

ISABELLA.

That is wonderful tidings, but what doth that mean for us?

FERDINAND.

The sultan is doomed! The Treaty of Granada that was signed and ratified on November 25, 1491, hath been honoured by the sultan, but this letter affirmeth this. The Granada War is definitely over! However, he hath made several requests.

ISABELLA.

Such as?

FERDINAND.

The rights to the Moors, including religious tolerance and fair treatment in return, for their surrender and capitulation. There are in total sixty-seven articles, that were included in the treaty.

ISABELLA.

I had understood that this treaty was ratified on November 25, 1491.

FERDINAND.

And 'twas, but this now reinforceth that treaty by the sultan. We have given him enough time, and now the sultan's period of fruition is over.

ISABELLA.

Thou hast decided then to act?

FERDINAND.

Yes, we shall recapture the city tomorrow and soon, we shall be honourable visitors of the venerable Palace of the Alhambra.

ISABELLA.

This shall be indeed, a momentous occasion to celebrate.

FERDINAND.

The eight-month siege of Granada hath been a complete success. Their situation is dire, and bribery is occurring at a rampant pace. If t'was not for the incompetence of the Granadan government to coordinate amongst itself in the midst of the disorder and tumult, then we would have taken the city before.

ISABELLA.

This was revealed to thee by the secretive spy?

FERDINAND.

Yes, but there one thing that the sultan is ignorant of its importance.

ISABELLA.

And what is that my noble king?

FERDINAND.

That within his inner circle of advisers, there is one in particular from amongst them that hath betrayed him since the beginning.

ISABELLA.

Who? Tell me at once, what is his name?

FERDINAND.

I cannot, because I do not even know, nor doth the informant know at this moment in time.

ISABELLA.

Then, how dost thou confide in such a man?

FERDINAND.

Because I trust this reliable source.

ISABELLA.

And what if he hath erred?

FERDINAND.

That I doubt very much, since I have bribed him handsomely.

ISABELLA.

But he is a Moor! How can we trust this adviser?

FERDINAND.

No more than the pathetic advisers we have had since the war began in Granada, in the year 1482.

ISABELLA.

If this is accurate, then the sultan is certainly doomed and is blinded to know of his internal adversaries that are more lethal than us.

FERDINAND.

The sultan is done as I have said before, and his beloved kingdom shall be no more!

ISABELLA.

Let it be, as thou hast uttered!

FERDINAND.

We must prepare the men, for the anticipated visit to Granada.

ISABELLA.

We must inform the bishop!

SCENE V.

At the Tribunal of the Holy Inquisition.

The Catholic Monarchs speak to the bishop in privacy.

ISABELLA.

My dear bishop of León, I did not mean to interrupt the proceedings of thine inquisition.

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

Thou art, never an interruption, my queen. Thou hast come in the most opportune occasion.

FERDINAND.

What hath occurred bishop?

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

We have been able to convert a hundred Moors to the doctrine of Catholicism, since I have arrived in the city.

FERDINAND.

I never thought the infidels could be converted, into our religion.

ISABELLA.

How do we know that their conversions are genuine bishop?

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

Trust me, when I say that they are unequivocally.

FERDINAND.

I need more than that. I need solid evidence to be presented.

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

With all due respect, my king. Art thou doubting the powerful divinity of our Lord Jesus Christ?

FERDINAND.

Art thou questioning my supreme authority, my good bishop?

ISABELLA.

If I am not mistaken, I believe that the bishop's point was in reverence to our Lord's ability to convert infidels to Christians than any token of indifference.

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

Exactly, my queen! 'Tis not mine intention to cast aspersion unto the king or my deference for his incisive remarks.

FERDINAND.

Good! Now that we have established that argument, we must concentrate on matters more pertinent, such as the surrender of Granada.

ISABELLA.

I am in absolute concurrence with that brilliant suggestion.

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

What in particular dost thou wishest, my noble queen?

ISABELLA.

I shall let the gracious king make the significant disclosure.

FERDINAND.

We shall be leaving the city of Córdoba for Granada.

ALFONSO DE VALDIVIESO.

When, if I may query, my noble king?

FERDINAND.

Tomorrow, the conquest of Granada shall be finalised.

ALFONSO DE VALIDIVIESO.

Shalt thou be requesting, my presence there?

FERDINAND.

Nay, we have requested the presence of the cardinal Pedro González de Mendoza and Bishop de Ávila, along with the monk Hernando de Talavera to accompany us.

ISABELLA.

Thy task is the inquisition and once thou hast returned to León, I shall have the Castilian Dominican friar Tomás de Torquemada and the cardinal Francisco Jiménez de Cisneros replace thee. We have sent a letter already to the pope explaining our reason for this action. We feel that thy task is yet unfinished in León,

ALFONSO DE VALDEVIESO.

I admit that I would have wanted to accompany ye both but I shall respect thine orders, my noble monarchs.

ISABELLA.

Thou shalt be informed of any more changes, upon thy return. We hope that thy return to León be a wondrous triumph.

SCENE VI.

At the General Court, within the Alcázar.

The Catholic Monarchs have made the important announcement to the knights of the Royal Monarchs that shall participate in the takeover of Granada. They speak afterwards to each other, with a definite certainty of confidence.

FERDINAND.

Our men are ready! I am ready for the challenge that awaits, beyond the horizon.

ISABELLA.

I wonder what we shall we expect from the sultan and in what state shall the city of Granada be in, when we arrive?

FERDINAND.

Mine expectations are nothing more than what was agreed, in the treaty between our kingdoms.

ISABELLA.

And the citizens of Granada shall they welcome us, as their liberators or their invaders?

FERDINAND.

I have imagined as liberators, since the terrible conditions they endure daily is the indisputable fault of their incompetent sultan.

ISABELLA.

I cannot dissuade the notion of a possible revolt against our control of the city, when we rule the city, under our dominion.

FERDINAND.

I would not concern myself with any possible revolt. I have sent enough men to defend Granada, in the case of any future incidents in the city.

ISABELLA.

I would hope that for the sake of the inhabitants of Granada that the transition of power be of a peaceful nature.

FERDINAND.

I do not foresee the need to meditate, such an unnecessary outcome.

ISABELLA.

Indeed, if the sultan and the Moors are to be trusted.

FERDINAND.

I do not care, whether they are to be trusted. I only care about their compliance to the treaty concurred.

ISABELLA.

I have thought many times in my mind the great significance of this event and its unknown ramifications.

FERDINAND.

And I have as well. For centuries our forefathers have failed to unite and drive the Moors from our lands.

ISABELLA.

Thou art correct! History shall record our magnificent deed, as the most laudable form of any royal accomplishment of two illustrious kingdoms.

FERDINAND.

History my queen is what we the rulers of the kingdoms create that history and what it personifieth.

ISABELLA.

There shall be a lot that must be done to erase the influence of the Moors.

FERDINAND.

That is where the inquisition shall ultimately eradicate the history of the Moors, from our beloved Hispania.

ISABELLA.

'Tis generally the belief that we must aspire to manifest, if we are to be successful.

FERDINAND.

Our glory shall be our greatest triumph that shall prevail over the Moors.

ISABELLA.

May God grant us victory!

SCENE VII.

At the Reception Hall.

The Royal Monarchs greet the clergy that shall accompany them to the city of Granada, on the eve of the downfall of Granada and the new inquisitors.

ISABELLA.

We are grateful to have thee here, and we hope that thy presence at Granada shall record the act of the acquisition of the city.

TOMÁS DE TORQUEMADA.

I am honoured that ye the Royal Monarchs have requested our presence and assistance.

FERDINAND.

We want the church represented, at the city of Granada.

FRANCISCO JIMÉNEZ DE CISNEROS.

For this, we are very thankful, my noble king. I hope that we do not disappoint ye.

ISABELLA.

Thou art my confessor and thou hast gained my trust, along with the Grand Inquisitor.

TOMÁS DE TORQUEMADA.

May the grace of God be with ye on this journey!

ISABELLA.

May the lord bless ye!

FRANCISCO JIMÉNEZ DE CISNEROS.

Have ye thought about what shall be done with the Moors, after the city is recaptured?

FERDINAND.

Indeed! There is a treaty that hath been agreed to, between us and the sultan.

TOMÁS DE TORQUEMADA.

If I may query my noble monarchs, what shall ye do with the distrustful Moors?

FERDINAND.

According to the treaty, the Moors shall retain their religion and rights, as long as they respect voluntarily our laws that govern.

FRANCISCO JIMÉNEZ DE CISNEROS.

And the rapacious Jews?

ISABELLA.

They shall be shortly expelled!

FRANCISCO JIMÉNEZ DE CISNEROS.

Then, why not expel the Moors as well? They are unruly infidels!

FERDINAND.

True, but we are hopeful that the Moors' conversion to Catholicism can be effectuated effectively. Of course, with the obedient assistance of the Catholic Church at the forefront.

FRANCISCO JIMÉNEZ DE CISNEROS.

If I may interject, I still believe that a dead Moor is better than a living infidel. However, whatever ye demand of us, we shall accomplish, my noble monarchs.

ISABELLA.

That is why, we have summoned ye both. Ye are trustworthy and highly recommended, by the Catholic Church.

FRANCISCO JIMÉNEZ DE CISNEROS.

We shall not fail ye, when the hour befalleth upon the infidels.

ISABELLA.

Let us hope that soon, we are all dining in the dining hall of the stately Alhambra exuberantly.

FERDINAND.

And seated upon the palatial throne of the powerless sultan.

ACT 5.

SCENE I.

At the Royal Chamber of the sultan in the Alhambra.

The sultan and the sultana are together, as they have awakened unawarely that this day would be the final time they would be the sole proprietors of the Alhambra.

MORAIMA.

I cannot dissuade the possibility that soon, our enchanting palace shall belong to the Catholic Monarchs.

MUHAMMAD.

I too cannot perceive the occurrence of that fathomless notion.

MORAIMA.

If that day is today, what shall happen to us afterwards?

MUHAMMAD.

We shall find another palace to live. All that is relevant to me is that we are together and our love shall bond us forever.

MORAIMA.

Where?

MUHAMMAD.

Whithersover it may be! God shall be with us!

MORAIMA.

I must admit that it shall be difficult to have to depart suddenly, from this palace and our homeland.

MUHAMMAD.

Certainly, I would be remiss, if I did not acknowledge the same conclusion.

MORAIMA.

Everything that we have built and added to this palace shall be enjoyed, by others that are not the rightful owners.

MUHAMMAD.

I share this grievous pain openly, but what they shall never have is the innumerable memories we have preserved of our ancestors faithfully.

MORAIMA.

I wince with the terrible thought of abandoning the palace that hath been our home for several decades.

MUHAMMAD.

The Alhambra shall always guard our most inner secrets, my dear.

MORAIMA.

To lie within thine arms within our chamber is the comfort that I shall miss and be deprived of its natural beauty.

MUHAMMAD.

Thou art my natural beauty, and I do not require the Alhambra to make that solemn confession.

MORAIMA.

I know thou speakest the truth. I can see this in thine eyes cleary as thou professest these words to me.

MUHAMMAD.

I speak the truth, and I shall die one day, with the blessings of God, as thy devoted companion.

MORAIMA.

I shall die with those veritable words, but my sorrow shall linger within me I sense, as if I have known death beforehand.

MUHAMMAD.

Do not allow thy sorrow, my beloved sultana be the echo of thy voice!

MORAIMA.

I shall attempt to not permit this to occur, whilst I am in thy presence, my sultan.

MUHAMMAD.

Remember that mine heart is thine, and thine is mine.

SCENE II.

At the Court of the Lions.

The sultan is joined by his mother, as trepidation befalls upon them, in the patent form of their reality, the loss of Granada and the Alhambra.

AISHA AL HURRA.

What has occurred to the messenger that I sent to the Catholic Monarchs?

MUHAMMAD.

I do not know the answer to that question, Mother.

AISHA AL HURRA.

Surely, he must have been assassinated or captured by the Christians.

MUHAMMAD.

Perchance, but now is not the time to dwell on hopeless gestures that shall not save our beloved Granada.

AISHA AL HURRA.

Hast thou not the courage to fight our enemy?

MUHAMMAD.

If 'twas my courage that was only lost, then I would die an honourable death, but I must think at this very moment, in the lives of the people of Granada. How many innocent persons must die for the sake of our glorious kingdom or palace?

AISHA AL HURRA.

Hast thou forgotten thine ancestors? Thou shalt be dishonouring their legacy, with this worthless shame!

MUHAMMAD.

If only honour was all that I lived for.

AISHA AL HURRA.

I cannot fathom the thought that history shall record this day, as the downfall of our memorable kingdom.

MUHAMMAD.

True, but I cannot live to think, what the future beholdeth me.

AISHA AL HURRA.

I see that thou art blinded by thine innocence and love for thy wife.

MUHAMMAD.

Perhaps I am, but I do not ask for thy blessing.

AISHA AL HURRA.

Whither shall we go?

MUHAMMAD.

We shall go south, until we can establish our kingdom anew.

AISHA AL HURRA.

Thy father was a stubborn man, but if he was alive, he would have never consented to this shameful action of thine, without a fight!

MUHAMMAD.

Hast thou forgotten? Thou wert the instigator in driving out of power and to his exile, my father and the Sultana Zoraida.

AISHA AL HURRA.

What I did, I did to make thee the sultan. How ungrateful art thou now, when the emirate is at its weakest moment in time. Where is thy courage? Where is the son that I bore thirty years ago?

MUHAMMAD.

I am no longer that innocent child thou had borne Mother.

AISHA AL HURRA.

Thou art not, but thou art, not thy father!

MUHAMMAD.

I would prefer to die a coward in thine eyes than a heartless man to my people.

AISHA AL HURRA.

I would hope that I do not have to see that day, but if it doth occur, then do not regret thine action committed.

MUHAMMAD.

I pray that God be merciful to our people.

AISHA AL HURRA.

Pray hard, because our enemies shall be less merciful than God.

MUHAMMAD.

Let us pray that not be the case, for our brethren and others!

SCENE III.

At the Royal Chamber of the sultan in the Alhambra.

A guard interrupts the sultan and his mother to inform them that the Castilian army is present and hands the sultan a letter informing him that he shall receive no immediate assistance, from the Ottoman Turks.

THE ROYAL GUARD.

Excuse mine interruption my sultan, but I must inform thee that the evident flags of the Crown of Castile of the Castilian Army has been spotted outside of the city's gates.

MUHAMMAD.

Where hast thou spotted the Castilian Army?

THE ROYAL GUARD.

From the Comares Tower, my sultan. They have also taken the palace. We are surrounded from outside and from inside the gates.

MUHAMMAD.

Let us go at once, so that I may see them.

The sultan and his mother arrive at the tower, and what they see is a spirited army of 10-12,000 men that stand before them, as three canons are heard obstreperously.

MUHAMMAD.

Behold the great and valiant Castilian Army!

AISHA AL HURRA.

They are no more than men of flesh, such as thyself and thy men.

MUHAMMAD.

If men died in mere flesh, then their souls would not exist.

AISHA AL HURRA.

Thy soul? Is not thy soul troubled, by what shall be lost?

MUHAMMAD.

What shall be lost shall be rebuilt once more, mother.

The sultan reads the contexts of the letter.

AISHA AL HURRA.

What doth the letter contain? Who was it sent by?

MUHAMMAD.

'Twas sent by the Great Ottoman Turks?

AISHA AL HURRA.

And what doth the letter reveal?

MUHAMMAD.

We are alone! No one shall be coming to our rescue mother!

AISHA AL HURRA.

What shall we do then?

MUHAMMAD.

Surrender!

AISHA AL HURRA.

Surrender the palace and thy kingdom, like a coward!

MUHAMMAD.

I am afraid there is no other alternative, but to accept the finality of our destiny and the terms of the treaty signed.

THE ROYAL GUARD.

Shall I inform the men of thy decision?

MUHAMMAD.

Yes! But before thou dost this, where is Mustapha, my adviser?

THE ROYAL GUARD.

That I do not know! I can instruct the guards to search for him.

AISHA AL HURRA.

Thou hast been blinded all this time, to not see the quisling that was before thine eyes. Mustapha hath betrayed thee. The bitter rivalry of the Muslims hath condemned thee and our lineage to perpetual disgrace!

MUHAMMAD.

Then blame them and not me! If we were only as united as the Christians, then we would have had an army to defend the city and the emirate. Yet, we are not!

SCENE IV.

At the small town of Santa Fé, only a mile from the outskirts of the city of Granada.

The Catholic Monarchs have arrived at the small town of Santa Fé, with their entourage and are together within their bedchamber, on the eve of the famous recapture of Granada.

ISABELLA.

Today is a precursor for a momentous victory and the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ to guide us to that victory.

FERDINAND.

There is nothing more than deserving to victory than us, my noble queen.

ISABELLA.

Our victory shall be celebrated by the Christian World, and by the pope in Rome.

FERDINAND.

There is no doubt whatsoever in my mind that the days of conquest shall not be limited to Granada. Instead, they shall be expanded to the rest of the world.

ISABELLA.

Can that be realised so plainly?

FERDINAND.

We shall attempt to unite the kingdoms of Hispania into one and under that banner, we shall rule the world.

ISABELLA.

If that be so, then let it commence in Granada, the last enclave of the Moors.

FERDINAND.

The Moors shall be a past discretion, and we must concentrate about the future, my beloved queen.

ISABELLA.

I pray one thing only that this vision of thine as a united Hispania be as authentic, as the conquest we have undertaken.

FERDINAND.

And it shall be like that!

ISABELLA.

'Tis a shame that it hath taken centuries to realise this consequential goal.

FERDINAND.

In the end what doth it matter, since we are now the rightful owners of all of Granada. Together Castile and Aragon shall dominate the world.

ISABELLA.

I have often wondered, what lieth beyond the seas.

FERDINAND.

Soon, we shall enough wealth amassed to answer that question.

ISABELLA.

We must never forget that to govern, we must be tolerant of our enemies.

FERDINAND.

Tolerant enough only to achieve our countless goals, yet to be established.

SPANISH ROYAL GUARD.

There is a person that claimeth to be an adviser to the sultan that wishest to speak to thee, mine honourable monarchs.

FERDINAND.

Tell him to wait in the Reception Hall.

SPANISH ROYAL GUARD.

Yes, my king!

Enters Mustapha the spy.

FERDINAND.

I did not summon thee to come to Santa Fé. Wherefore hast thou come to see me so abruptly and unannouncedly?

MUSTAPHA.

I came to claim what is rightfully mine, the money that is owed to me, my kind king.

Ferdinand orders one of his guards to give him one hundred reals, for being an informant to the Catholic Monarchs.

FERDINAND.

There, thou hast thy reals that were promised to thee. Go now, and if we are in need of thy service again, we shall seek thee.

Mustapha bows in reverence to the Catholic Monarchs, and departs, never to be seen anew.

MUSTAPHA.

Thank ye, and may God be with ye!

ISABELLA.

I wonder, how can a man betray his own sultan so brazenly?

FERDINAND.

I would imagine that he is a selfish man, who hath no conscious at all, as many men are known to display these days regrettably.

SCENE V.

At the edge of the town of Santa Fé, by the banks of the Genil, the Catholic Monarchs wait eagerly, for the Moorish Sultan to appear before them in capitulation.

Slowly, the sultan emerges from the horizon and approaches the Catholic Monarchs steadily, with eighty or a hundred men on horseback and very well dressed in their splendid attires. The sultan goes forth to kiss the hand of the Highnesses, but they refuse the gesture of the sultan, as the last humiliation imposed upon him, by the Sovereigns of Catholicism.

MUHAMMAD.

My noble Highnesses, I hand over to ye, the keys of the emirate, the city of Granada and the palace of the Alhambra.

FERDINAND.

I thank thee for thy propriety sultan, and thou art free to leave Granada willingly, with thy family and servants, as in accordance to the treaty signed, between our two kingdoms.

MUHAMMAD.

And what shall befall unto my people of Granada, if I may query?

ISABELLA.

They have nothing to fear from us, as long as they respect our jurisdiction and are lawful citizens of Granada.

MUHAMMAD.

They shall not be forced to abandon their religion forcefully? How do I know that ye shall honour thy word in the end?

FERDINAND.

Know that we shall obey the terms of the treaty concurred, as stipulated.

MUHAMMAD.

Then, God be willing!

The sultan departs afterwards with his men back to the palace, where he shall be granted four days, before he must leave forever, the glorious Alhambra of Al Andalus.

ISABELLA.

Now that Granada is ours I wonder, what shall we find, upon our visit to the city and the Moorish Palace?

FERDINAND.

I suppose, we shall discover the setting of the remarkable changing of one ancient past to a new and prosperous beginning that we are the sole participants of its grandeur.

ISABELLA.

Shall that grandeur be more stately than our beloved palace?

FERDINAND.

I doubt it truly, but I have heard stories that say that there is no palace that can evoke such intense passion, as the decorative Alhambra.

ISABELLA.

Those are only foolish tales of Moorish lore spoken.

FERDINAND.

Even if so, the thought doth provoke my curiosity.

ISABELLA.

I must be candid with mine admission that I too share this unique curiosity within me.

FERDINAND.

Soon, we shall have the great pleasure of satisfying that growing fascination.

THE ROYAL GUARD.

Shall we be returning to Santa Fé, my noble king?

FERDINAND.

Yes, let us return at once. The deed is done, and we have conquered Granada, without the loss of any one man of our vast and superior army.

ISABELLA.

Indeed! Let us return to Santa Fé, as worthy triumphers!

FERDINAND.

May the spirit and will of our Lord reign, over these lands for centuries to come.

ISABELLA.

Granada is ours to establish the Gospel of the Lord. May the banners of Castile and Aragón stand, over this city.

FERDINAND.

Hitherto, we are his fortuitous enforcers, upon the kingdoms of men. At last, the Moors have been defeated!

SCENE VI.

At a rocky prominence of the Assabica Valley, outside of the palace of the Alhambra.

The sultan, his family and loyal servants depart Granada for the last time. The expression on the countenance of the sultan is of a sorrow and regret that cannot efface the indelible image of the Alhambra.

AISHA AL HURRA.

Thou weepest now, when thou hast lost our beloved kingdom, lands and above all, our beautiful Alhambra.

MUHAMMAD.

I mourn for all of that precisely.

AISHA AL HURRA.

Thou mournest as a coward, what thou wert unable to defend with thy courage and blood.

MUHAMMAD.

I did what I had to do to spare our people, our kingdom, our lands, and our palace, their absolute destruction.

AISHA AL HURRA.

At the consequence of thy glory?

MUHAMMAD.

What is glory, without defeat?

AISHA AL HURRA.

Then, I would have preferred complete ruination than this disgraceful subjection.

MUHAMMAD.

Hast thou no pity for my soul, in the hour of my grief and remembrance?

AISHA AL HURRA.

Pity, is a blind man's susceptibility and failure of his irrefutable acknowledgement.

MUHAMMAD.

Why dost thou forsake me, Mother? I did what thou wanted me to do, when I ruled with dominance.

AISHA AL HURRA.

True, but I behold the coward that lost his kingdom, without a fight. Thou hast forsaken thyself, in obeisance to them!

MUHAMMAD.

We can govern from the principality afforded to us, by the treaty and still remain in Granada our homeland.

AISHA AL HURRA.

A useless confession! For how long? Dost thou believe that the Catholic Monarchs, who have exiled us to the inhospitable mountains that shall be our prison shall allow us to remain freely, amongst their lands, not as their subjects? Do not blind thyself, with the pretension of their gentility. Under no circumstance, they shall keep their deceitful word for much time!

MUHAMMAD.

We shall live, as we have always lived. We shall never be their subjects now or then!

MORAIMA.

My dearest sultan, and dashing husband. How mine heart crieth for our irreversible losses. How can I assuage the sorrow of mine heart and soul, with this sombre tragedy?

MUHAMMAD.

Know that there is no tragedy that could replace or diminish our interminable bond and love.

MORAIMA.

And what shall I tell our child, when he asketh for his home?

MUHAMMAD.

Tell him that we are a proud people that come from an incomparable lineage. Our new home shall be better than the Alhambra.

MORAIMA.

And Al Andalus? What shall become of it?

MUHAMMAD.

God be willing, Al Andalus shall forever dwell in our hearts and in our lasting memories, until our deaths!

Shortly after his surrender, the last sultan of Al Andalus Abū 'Abdi-llāh Muḥammad ath-thānī 'ashar had sent a long letter to the Marinid rulers of Morocco asking for refuge. The letter begins with a long poem praising the Marinids, followed by a prose passage where he laments his defeat and asks forgiveness, for past wrongdoings of his forefathers against the Marinids. The entire text was reported by the historian al-Maqqari.

...The lord of Castile has proposed for us a respectable residence and has given us assurances of safety to which he pledged by his own handwriting, enough to convince the souls. But we, as descendants of Banu al-Ahmar, didn't settle for this and our faith in God doth not permit us to reside, under the protection of disbelief.

We also received from the east many letters full of goodwill, inviting us to come to their lands and offering the best of advantages. But we cannot choose other than our home and the home of our forefathers, we can only accept the protection of our relatives, not because of opportunism but to confirm the brotherhood relationship between us and to fulfill the testament of our forefathers, that tells us not to seek any help other that of the Marinids and not to let anything obstruct us from going to ye. So we traversed the vast lands and sailed the tumultuous sea and we hope that we would not be returned and that our eyes will be satisfied and our hurt and grievous souls will be healed from this great pain...

THE END.

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